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  • Summer Exhibition 2020

Breaking Point: Fragility in clay and nature

Friday 22nd May to  Sunday 20th September 2020

Three artists, Mella Shaw, Jayne Ivimey, and Elspeth Owen, will exhibit work inspired by the natural world among the displays in the Museum of Zoology. All three have a strong interest in the environmental movement and create ceramics that seek to engage, provoke and stimulate discussion.

With artworks placed in and amongst the cases of taxidermy, skeletons and specimens in jars, visitors will see the Museum’s collections in a new light. Throughout the exhibition, the fragility of fired clay as a material is explored in a context of ecological decline, ecosystem collapse and environmental change and uncertainty.

Image: Mella Shaw_HARVEST_detail 2018. Photo © Andrew Norman

What Clay Can Say

Our three artists, Mella Shaw, Jayne Ivimey and Elspeth Owen are holding a free talk about their forthcoming exhibition. The talk will be held at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge on 20 May at 1.15pm. Further details available here. Please do join us. 

About the artists

Mella Shaw: With a background in anthropology and a former career in museums and galleries, Mella makes clay objects and installations that address reoccurring environmental themes of balance, tipping-points, fragility and loss.

Jayne Ivimey: Based in Norfolk, Jayne creates a range of works that depict the natural world.  Having spent seven years working on bird conservation in New Zealand, much of her recent work includes references to birds and the challenges they face. 

Elspeth Owen: With a long established studio in Grantchester, near Cambridge, Elspeth’s work has been shown worldwide, and is held in the permanent collections of the Fitzwilliam Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

The exhibition is located throughout the Museum and entry is free. 

Header image: Mella Shaw_HARVEST_2018 Image 7 © Sophie Mutevelian

 

Header image: Mella Shaw_HARVEST_2018 Image 6 © Sophie Mutevelian

This exhibition is organised in collaboration with the Arts, Science and Conservation Programme at Cambridge Conservation Initiative.